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Showing posts from May, 2018

My poor little engine

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Dearest readers,
No picture or otherwise today. I have a lot of titles in my drafts with no effort to start them. Each time they start but then they quickly end up off track and not saying what I want to say. I think I have a bit of writer's block. I want to find my words again and I'm hoping my voice returns soon.
As I lay here I can hear the ambulances from the local hospital whizzing down the main road. We live quite close to a main A road and to the local fire station so it's not something I am not used to, but today it's quite nice listening to the noises from the road and the helicopter flying overhead. This also makes it sound like I live in a very busy place when I don't. It's like an enclave surrounded by green with a view of the river, with the trees all the way down the hill to the river. We have lots of birds too: Jays, doves, wagtails, sparrows and the odd obese pigeon. Listening to these sounds is grounding, it makes me feel at home. Not home hom…

Four reasons why we are not all "a little autistic"

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Dearest readers, 
Time to bust another myth, hard hats on. The title is the question: Why are we not a "little autistic"?  The gif has my answer: no. Actually, the gif has the shortened version of my answer. It's an absolute no for various reasons, although I can trace some of the reasons why this conclusion might be drawn. I guess I write this to explain what I mean and potentially what others may mean when this question is raised, or more often than not, as a statement of fact where others try to make sense of autism or  try assert that they know something rather than an opening to discourse and learning. It ends up with a discourse dominated with inequality, statements, false truths and assumptions. 

Reason number one: it's unreachable  Being autistic is a state, a status quo, a way of being and experiencing the world, however this may be. It is woven intrinsically into who you are, how you exist, whatever your standpoint is. This, added to the fact that you canno…

Learning to amplify my voice: why loud is not always best

The strongest minds are often those whom the noisy world hears last - William Wordsworth
Dearest readers, 
This post is going to discuss one of my pet peeves. It has been one throughout my life, moreso when I was much younger however the more I meet people and groups of people vying for attention, clamour and recognition, the more I find myself drawn back to this. As I have grown, I have come to appreciate what actually it means to be "loud" and to be heard, what it means to speak over others, what it means to step on others trying to climb upwards. My pet peeve? The valuing of loud individuals over and at the expense of those who do not hold the power to be heard: be it through volume, power, experience, lifeworld, popularity or majority among other concepts. 
Why is this so utterly infuriating to me? For a start I am a bit of a bossy boots and am known for 'getting things done', but I sadly do not possess a loud voice in day to day life (apart from at home). Often …

Listening to what you want to hear

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Dearest readers,
A question to start: are we listening to what we think others say... or are we listening to what others actually say?
How about we look at it this way. Are we placing our own bias purposely into our consideration of what others say? Are we framing  what we hear on previous experiences and also on what we would say in that situation? My argument would be that we always do this to a certain extent, for we use what we do know as scaffolds to piece together what we don't. We construct these 'new' ideas using reference points, many of which are likely to be our own. It is highly likely there are times that we don't realise we filter all information through our own understanding, but I can bet you we can become more aware. I furthermore argue that through using this filter to scaffold together our understanding, we can, and do, distort what others may mean or rather, intend to mean, in communication. 
One reason for this is the difficulty in constructing id…